American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic

Nancy K. Bristow

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American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic

American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic By Nancy K. Bristow American Pandemic The Lost Worlds of the Influenza Epidemic Between the years and influenza raged around the globe in the worst pandemic in recorded history killing at least fifty million people than half a million of them Americans Yet despite the

  • Title: American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic
  • Author: Nancy K. Bristow
  • ISBN: 9780199811342
  • Page: 341
  • Format: Hardcover
  • American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic By Nancy K. Bristow Between the years 1918 and1920, influenza raged around the globe in the worst pandemic in recorded history, killing at least fifty million people, than half a million of them Americans Yet despite the devastation, this catastrophic event seems but a forgotten moment in the United States.American Pandemic offers a much needed corrective to the silence surrounding theBetween the years 1918 and1920, influenza raged around the globe in the worst pandemic in recorded history, killing at least fifty million people, than half a million of them Americans Yet despite the devastation, this catastrophic event seems but a forgotten moment in the United States.American Pandemic offers a much needed corrective to the silence surrounding the influenza outbreak It sheds light on the social and cultural history of Americans during the pandemic, uncovering both the causes of the nation s public amnesia and the depth of the quiet remembering that endured Focused on the primary players in this drama patients and their families, friends, and community, public health experts, and health care professionals historian Nancy K Bristow draws on multiple perspectives to highlight the complex interplay between social identity, cultural norms, memory, and the epidemic Bristow has combed a wealth of primary sources, including letters, diaries, oral histories, memoirs, novels, newspapers, magazines, photographs, government documents, and health care literature She shows that though the pandemic caused massive disruption in the most basic patterns of American life, influenza did not create long term social or cultural change, serving instead to reinforce the status quo and the differences and disparities that defined American life.As the crisis waned the pandemic slipped from the nation s public memory The helplessness and despair Americans had suffered during the pandemic, Bristow notes, was a story poorly suited to a nation focused on optimism and progress For countless survivors, though, the trauma never ended, shadowing the remainder of their lives with memories of loss This book lets us hear these long silent voices, reclaiming an important chapter in the American past.
    American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic By Nancy K. Bristow

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      341 Nancy K. Bristow
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      Posted by:Nancy K. Bristow
      Published :2019-08-10T21:25:43+00:00

    One thought on “American Pandemic: The Lost Worlds of the 1918 Influenza Epidemic

    1. Triste on said:

      This was an interesting book, but I felt it created expectations that were not fulfilled It was fairly readable and accurate, but I was expecting within the chapters a intimate view of living through the influenza epidemic through various people s eyes I felt it didn t fulfill that expectation, but I was impressed nonetheless with the amount of sources she pulled together for an accurate, if somewhat dry and detached, view of the time.

    2. Mary Ronan Drew on said:

      To read my review go to my blog at maryslibrary.typepad my_we

    3. Andy on said:

      The book does include numerous interesting episodes but it overall disappointed me This is a social history dealing with the aftermath Personally I m interested in what caused the pandemic than in the cultural interpretation of it But even there I feel the author missed an opportunity to debunk myths, instead repeating things like the forgotten pandemic meme, even though she starts the book with the contradictory anecdote of how the memory was kept alive in her family Other books have already s [...]

    4. Margaret Sankey on said:

      Rather than a narrative history like Crosby s very thorough account, this is a selection of the effects on public health and medicine, from the complacency of a quarter century of dealing with yearly flu that killed elderly people and spawned ads touting hot lemonade as a defense, the shock to the extended families and welfare system of a rapid influx of orphaned children from not just the lower classes, the tragic irony that because black doctors and nurses had been pushed out of military and R [...]

    5. Timothy on said:

      Masterful history of the often overlooked pandemic that killed 700,000 in the U.S alone This is the latest and perhaps the best of several books in the field that began with Alfred Crosby s Forgotten Epidemic and continued with Gina Kolata, John Barry and others The topic is also the subject of a PBS documentary pbs wgbh americanexper which is also quite good The book analyzes how it was that we forgot the pandemic in war worried U.S but also looks at local history as well.

    6. Mary Brodd on said:

      Main takeaway gendered reactions to pandemic male doctors felt sense of failure from inability to cure disease and from death of patients, while female nurses were able to care for nurture the ill regardless of outcome even if patient died, nurse had done her job to best of ability Not sure if this was worth the read Still looking for something will tell me why this pandemic seems to have fallen into a memory hole for American society This wasn t it.

    7. Tony on said:

      Interesting if you are interested Not much time spent on the conventional history of the 1918 pandemic it s mostly a collection of personal, social, and professional experiences of the event and its aftermath as drawn from personal writings, newspapers, and journal articles Sufficiently concise.

    8. Julie on said:

      Very dense with facts and information A lot to digest While about the 1918 flu epidemic, many of its points were echoed eerily in the recent Ebola situation So, not just a history book, but relevant to current events.

    9. Bonnie on said:

      Informative but too academic I was hoping for anecdotal stories but still a good browse.

    10. Diane Henry on said:

      Couldn t finish Ponderously written with text saturated with unnecessary quotations Picking up David Quammen s beautifully written and engaging Spillover made the contrast in styles stark.

    11. Macaela on said:

      This was an interesting book, but a bit dry It s good, if you re really interested in it.

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