Faith, Reason, and the Plague in Seventeenth Century Tuscany

Carlo M. Cipolla

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Faith, Reason, and the Plague in Seventeenth Century Tuscany

Faith, Reason, and the Plague in Seventeenth Century Tuscany By Carlo M. Cipolla Faith Reason and the Plague in Seventeenth Century Tuscany By the late fall of the Black Plague had descended upon northern Italy The prentice Magistry of Public Health centered in Florence took steps to contain and combat the scourge In this essay C

  • Title: Faith, Reason, and the Plague in Seventeenth Century Tuscany
  • Author: Carlo M. Cipolla
  • ISBN: 9780393000450
  • Page: 319
  • Format: Paperback
  • Faith, Reason, and the Plague in Seventeenth Century Tuscany By Carlo M. Cipolla By the late fall of 1630, the Black Plague had descended upon northern Italy The prentice Magistry of Public Health, centered in Florence, took steps to contain and combat the scourge In this essay, Carlo Cipolla recreates the daily struggle of plague stricken Monte Lupo, a rustic Tuscan village, revealing in the vivid terms of actual events and personalities a central dBy the late fall of 1630, the Black Plague had descended upon northern Italy The prentice Magistry of Public Health, centered in Florence, took steps to contain and combat the scourge In this essay, Carlo Cipolla recreates the daily struggle of plague stricken Monte Lupo, a rustic Tuscan village, revealing in the vivid terms of actual events and personalities a central drama of Western civilization the conflict between faith and reason, Church and state.
    Faith, Reason, and the Plague in Seventeenth Century Tuscany By Carlo M. Cipolla

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    One thought on “Faith, Reason, and the Plague in Seventeenth Century Tuscany

    1. Makomai on said:

      Leggere Cipolla e sempre rinfrescante Con la sua solita arguzia, qui narra una delle microstorie cui ci ha abituati il dissidio tra autorita civili e religiose in un piccolo paese toscano nel 1630, allo scoppiare di un epidemia di peste Il parroco di Monte Lupo organizza una processione salvifica , in spregio del divieto di adunanze emesso dal magistrato per evitare il contagio Come sempre, Cipolla descrive con pochi tratti incisivi personaggi e mentalita , con un linguaggio che ben si armonizza [...]

    2. Andrea Petrullo on said:

      I m of the opinion that there are few things in this world better than a good outbreak of plague Carlo Cipolla s retelling of the plague s visits to the small town of Monte Lupo is actually surprisingly funny Cipolla draws on primary sources such as correspondance and public records dating to the 14th century to piece togeather clues as to why public health measures in Monte Lupo went so horrible wrong Sanitation and quarentine laws broken almost as soon as they were passed, and the town had ina [...]

    3. Eliszard on said:

      In summer 1631, don Antonio Bontadi, the priest of Monte Lupo, stages a procession to beg for an end to the plague that is sweeping through the Tuscan countryside The civilian authorities, backed by Father Giovanni Dragone in charge of the pest house and of the health board of the village , want to stop it, or at least to prevent women and children from attending, to avoid a worsening of the epidemic The processions goes ahead, but the civilian authorities want to see the priest and his accompli [...]

    4. Melissa Tamayo on said:

      I would ve never read this for fun on my own, but I m glad I was forced class requirement to do so It is surprisingly very funny informative of course The books tone is narrative than your usual, typical dry sometimes boring, textbook It s about the plague, obviously, but what is the most interesting in the book for me, at least are the peoples reactions, emotions behavior during such a horrible epidemic in the small town of Monte Lupo If you re a history buff, I recommend giving this tiny book [...]

    5. Sam Ruddick on said:

      there are a couple slow moments but for the most part this is good story telling, good history, and very funny there s nothing funnier than unhappinessd it s short, too if it were fiction, i d say it s a metaphor for the change that took place between the renaissance and the enlightenment it s the transition between one phase of history and another, summarized surprisingly accurately in the form of an anecdote.

    6. Terry Earley on said:

      Though very interested in this period of history, I never would have read this short book unless recommended Thanks Sam.By taking a very small slice of time in an obscure Italian village, Cipolla was able with the available record, to give a very personal picture of actual people of the time dealing with very real problems Their lives became then, very real to me.

    7. Dan on said:

      Microhistory in the style of Natalie Zemon Davis The Return of Martin Guerre I would assign it if I were teaching a class on disease history the small example says a lot about the period Cipolla is always a pleasure to read.

    8. Stephanie Islas on said:

      Loved reading about rowdy peasants Read this book for a class, but I really enjoyed it

    9. Michelle Smith taylor on said:

      Interesting, however, not as indepth as I would have liked Very superficial.

    10. Thomas on said:

      subject matter also can be read about in The Plague camus and Narcissus and Goldmund hesse well researched and explored subject.

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