Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei

David Mura

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Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei

Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei By David Mura Turning Japanese Memoirs of a Sansei Award winning poet David Mura s critically acclaimed memoir Turning Japanese chronicles how a year in Japan transformed his sense of self and pulled into sharp focus his complicated inheritance Mura i

  • Title: Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei
  • Author: David Mura
  • ISBN: 9780802142399
  • Page: 153
  • Format: Paperback
  • Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei By David Mura Award winning poet David Mura s critically acclaimed memoir Turning Japanese chronicles how a year in Japan transformed his sense of self and pulled into sharp focus his complicated inheritance Mura is a sansei, a third generation Japanese American who grew up on baseball and hot dogs in a Chicago suburb, where he heard Yiddish than Japanese Turning Japanese chronicAward winning poet David Mura s critically acclaimed memoir Turning Japanese chronicles how a year in Japan transformed his sense of self and pulled into sharp focus his complicated inheritance Mura is a sansei, a third generation Japanese American who grew up on baseball and hot dogs in a Chicago suburb, where he heard Yiddish than Japanese Turning Japanese chronicles his quest for identity with honesty, intelligence, and poetic vision and it stands as a classic meditation on difference and assimilation and is a valuable window onto a country that has long fascinated our own Turning Japanese was a New York Times Notable Book and winner of an Oakland PEN Josephine Miles Book Award This edition includes a new afterword by the author.
    Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei By David Mura

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    One thought on “Turning Japanese: Memoirs of a Sansei

    1. Andrea on said:

      One of my literature professors gave me this book as a gift when he learned that I am going to teach English in Japan Author David Mura is a third generation Japanese American poet and these memoirs chronicle his first trip to Japan, his family history, his experience growing up Asian American while surrounded by white people in the Midwest, and his quest to make sense of his identity based on cultural perceptions of race and sexuality While Mura does describe cultural differences between the U. [...]

    2. yo on said:

      i found this guy incredibly annoying one time he remembered to take off his shoes at someone s house while his caucasian wife forgot this revealed to him how truly japanese he was, even as a sansei 3rd generation japanese he spent only one year in japan and thought he knew everything i also learned that japanese restaurants serve small glasses of water because japanese people have small bladders.

    3. Marie on said:

      I thoroughly enjoyed reading this chapter in David s life As a Japanese American, I can relate to so much of what he shared It ended rather abruptly for me, as do so many books I read I guess that s what sequels are for It was not a fast read for me I found myself taking my time and really letting the words and shared emotional journey sink in before continuing I found I would read a few pages or sometimes a chapter and stop and his words would find their way back into my head when I least expec [...]

    4. Esther on said:

      I found Mura s observations of Japan to be very descriptive and nuanced as only a poet could be I could identify with his struggles and observations as an Asian American who grew up in Japan, looking the same on the outside but different on the inside I felt like he put words to many of the things I felt however I did not feel the anger that he felt I think I have the benefit of being of a later generation with representation and voice in the American landscape and my gratitude for having been [...]

    5. Sara on said:

      Patently insincere memoir about a man who goes to Japan, practices Noh, tries to cheat on his wife, fails, and then takes solace in a hammy scene at his grandfather s grave Shrine Can t remember Some interesting observations about Japan.

    6. Selena on said:

      1st book I ve read from a Japanese American perspective of finding oneself in Japan As a Nisei, I related to many of his experiences, but others, such as the sexism in Japan were things I had never really thought too much about, having only lived there briefly as a child and now, having only superficial association with Japanese culture, living in the US But, this, like other biographies of Nisei and Sansei I have read, re inforces the idea that Japanese Americans can never quite fit in to Ameri [...]

    7. Lauren on said:

      The author s kind of a jerk Why his wife didn t leave him we ll never know It was also hard to identify with him because he hates to travel, and has anger management issues.

    8. Allan on said:

      What a good and interesting book, and I read a library copy Read on recommendation of lots of other books that recommended it, and they re not wrong at all On my wish list because even though it s already been read I would still like to own a copy, too, Premise a sansei third generation Japanese born American poet, chooses Japan for a oversees travel grant he is awarded and hijinks follow HIs parents grew up in Japanese speaking houses, but David and his sisters never spoke Japanese in their Eva [...]

    9. Laurie on said:

      Chapter One Jet lag Perhaps But the vertigo I felt seemed to come not just from the spinning of the earth but from a sense of hovering above the earth, from the very unreality of the country I had thought was my home.The sunlight off the lawn was blinding, the spaces between the houses immense, the sky an unbelievably wide expanse of blue Where were the crowds, the small, cramped spaces of Tokyo The thing is, I did not want to get over it This disequilibrium was like a cold you caught from a bri [...]

    10. Kristi on said:

      I m fascinated by modern Japanese culture, so I was interested in reading this from the viewpoint of a fellow American Whilst it began promisingly, it soon turned into a pin pricking tale of an overseas marital bitchfest between the author and his apparently slightly bigoted wife The cuisine, living quarters, transportation and the author s idea of cultural learning weren t good enough for the wife, while the author entertained the idea of a fling with women in their inner circle Makes the Japan [...]

    11. Anagha Uppal on said:

      Each time I read a book about culture, race, and identity, I come a little bit closer to solving my own identity crisis I have met few Japanese, and often couldn t identify Mura s search for identity, but I can see much clearly now what he accomplished and what I am searching for I need to visit India

    12. Byron Kawaichi on said:

      A memoir of a Sansei poet and novelist who, in the midst of uncertainty about how American he is, visits the land of his grandparents He comes away with mixed feelings and the book itself is a bit mixed between vivid description and the author s internal processes Definitely worth reading, though.

    13. Jeff on said:

      Interesting, but much, much too long couldn t the publisher hire an editor , and full of Japanese language errors and misplaced geography Mr Mura seems to be interesting from afar, but, as the books plods along, up close his vanity outshines his path to self awareness.

    14. Maggie on said:

      It was interesting to read about a Japanese American s experience with living in Japan for a year The whole concept of going back to the country where everyone looks the same, but you don t quite fit in made for interesting reading.

    15. Ceci on said:

      I had to read this book during undergrad for a class but I m glad I did I likely wouldn t have picked it up otherwise but it was definitely worth the read This book is great for anyone who has ever wondered how they can connect or reconnect with their roots.

    16. Chelsea on said:

      Not for me Mura has some beautifully poetic passages and good ideas sifted throughout the book, but I spent about 90% of the book bored out of my mind.

    17. Carol Peters on said:

      Thoughtful memoir about otherness by a Japanese American Sansei poet who spent a year living in Japan on an arts grant.

    18. Ruth on said:

      I enjoyed this when I read it, in part because of the fond memories of Tokyo that the book brought back.

    19. Daniel on said:

      Thorough, though he even says that some parts were exaggerated to make the sociocultural reality look harsher than it actually was for him Very enjoyable.

    20. Benjamin on said:

      My edition is signed by author, we saw him do a reading This is before I was to go to Japan for a three year JET Programme contract He wished me best wishes and to enjoy my sojourn to Japan.

    21. Katie on said:

      St Paul poet s memoir of his year in Japan as a third generation Japanese American a sansei In Japan, he visibly fits in, but wrestles with identity and assimilationa quest for identity.

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