Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic

Erskine Clarke

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Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic

Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic By Erskine Clarke Dwelling Place A Plantation Epic Published some thirty years ago Robert Manson Myers s Children of Pride The True Story of Georgia and the Civil War won the National Book Award in history and went on to become a classic reference on

  • Title: Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic
  • Author: Erskine Clarke
  • ISBN: 9780300122565
  • Page: 177
  • Format: Paperback
  • Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic By Erskine Clarke Published some thirty years ago, Robert Manson Myers s Children of Pride The True Story of Georgia and the Civil War won the National Book Award in history and went on to become a classic reference on America s slaveholding South That book presented the letters of the prominent Presbyterian minister and plantation patriarch Charles Colcock Jones 1804 1863 , whose familyPublished some thirty years ago, Robert Manson Myers s Children of Pride The True Story of Georgia and the Civil War won the National Book Award in history and went on to become a classic reference on America s slaveholding South That book presented the letters of the prominent Presbyterian minister and plantation patriarch Charles Colcock Jones 1804 1863 , whose family owned than one hundred slaves While extensive, these letters can provide only one part of the story of the Jones family plantations in coastal Georgia In this remarkable new book, the religious historian Erskine Clarke completes the story, offering a narrative history of four generations of the plantations inhabitants, white and black.Encompassing the years 1805 to 1869, Dwelling Place A Plantation Epic describes the simultaneous but vastly different experiences of slave and slave owner This upstairsdownstairs history reveals in detail how the benevolent impulses of Jones and his family became ideological supports for deep oppression, and how the slave Lizzy Jones and members of her family struggled against that oppression Through letters, plantation and church records, court documents, slave narratives, archaeological findings, and the memory of the African American community, Clarke brings to light the long suppressed history of the slaves of the Jones plantations a history inseparably bound to that of their white owners.
    Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic By Erskine Clarke

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    One thought on “Dwelling Place: A Plantation Epic

    1. Lobstergirl on said:

      Erskine Clarke sifts through seemingly endless family histories and letters to tell us the story of the white slaveowning population of Liberty County, Georgia the low country south of Savannah and north of Darien , and their slaves from the early 19th century to the aftermath of the Civil War Clearly, there is to tell about the owners, since they could read and write and left voluminous correspondence and journals But Clarke does an excellent job of extracting every bit of data and anecdote he [...]

    2. Mom on said:

      One of the best books I ve ever read is Children of Pride by Robert Manson Myers An absolutely incredible, emotional and amazing book, it consists of a collection of letters between members of the Georgia family of Charles Colcock Jones from 1854 1868 just before, during and after the Civil War The experiences of that family are epic Their 100 or so slaves are mentioned in their letters, but are mostly invisible.And the thought uppermost in my mind after finishing the book was puzzlement These w [...]

    3. Tim on said:

      The book leapt out at me because of blurbs by David Brion Davis, Mark Noll, and John Boles, preeminent historians of slavery, American religion, and the American south, respectively it also won the Bancroft Prize for best work in American history in 2006 Caldwell s book is remarkably written history, following the lives of generations of slaveholders along the Georgia coast and the slaves they owned His research is prodigous, we know the geography and we know the people deeply, even intimately I [...]

    4. Margaret Sankey on said:

      Dual biography of the white owners of a complex of rice cotton plantations and their Gullah slaves from 1805 1869 This is a fascinating reconstruction of two worlds that occupied the same time and space but were radically removed in every other possible aspect It is fascinating to see how developments in the white family marriages, deaths, wills affect the slaves along with the devastating toll of malaria and fevers on the plantation owners one woman has four husbands die before she s 28, and th [...]

    5. Dana on said:

      I had the privilege to meet the author and hear him speak about creating this wonderful book I was literally spellbound and I am not afraid to admit that he was an inspiration I loved this book Yes, it is quite long, and at times, it is difficult to keep track of the diverse characters in this history But, it is one of the most well written history books I have ever read If you are interested in the sea islands, you must read it but only if you can simultaneously tour the areas that he describes [...]

    6. Kevin Hoag on said:

      Very well researched story of plantations in coastal Georgia, from about 1820 until after the Civil War The author was conscientious about presenting the stories of both white and black, and focused on a plantation where one of the sons went north to seminary, and then struggled wth conflicts over slavery Especially interesting was how often the white plantation owners expressed surprise when the slaves tried to escape, or sought their freedom during the war Also important were the recorded pers [...]

    7. Jim Hodge on said:

      I met the author, so had to read his book It kept me engaged The main character and this is non fiction is a Presbyterian minister who is also a slave owner and plantation owner in the South His struggle with the issues of the Civil War, religion, etc were well described, and helped to get some historical perspective on slavery from both the slaves perspective and the plantationists perspective.

    8. Kerri on said:

      An important reminder of slavery, institutions and faithfulness I found myself wondering what blinders I wear today that keep me from seeing truth when it is not to my advantage to do so.Clarke is a professor of American Church history at Columbia Theological Seminary so it does read a bit like a history book not that there is anything wrong with that

    9. Lynne on said:

      Based on historical records of the Jones family of the Georgia coast, this book is a worthy effort toward depicting life in the slave families of this Civil War era community Some assumptions are involved to fill in gaps in the records, but the author does an admirable job of bringing real people out of the shadows Read as a follow up to the real epic, Children of Pride.

    10. Chuck on said:

      An amazing story of low country Georgia life in the antebellum period I was constantly surprised by the depth of knowledge the author had about the lives of these white and black people the family s manuscript collections must be very rich indeed Although this was a long slog for a reader who prefers fiction, I think it is one of the most interesting books I ve ever read.

    11. Janie Lynes on said:

      I had to read this for a class I did read the whole thing and it was ok but I thought there were too many characters The book could have portrayed a successful parallel with far less characters especially since many die soon after they are introduced.

    12. Meagan on said:

      Enjoyed this read immensely and enjoyed meeting and discussing it with the author even Very insightful story of the Charles Colcock Jones family.

    13. J. on said:

      Read this book if you want to understand why slavery in the Old South was not only brutal to the slaves but also corrupted the slaveowners.

    14. JD Pruitt on said:

      Most boring book I ve ever read Medical treatment and meals during this period in history was kind of interesting to learn about, however.

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